The toughest women of Pakistan who fought 200 armed men all alone

Women Power is a new notion to encourage the women and the girls of the present and future era, but the words are just not enough. There is a dire need for examples and real-life stories to motivate and urge the women of today to stand for their rights and avail them.

Bravery is a virtue and both men and women have it, depends on how they utilize and how strong their will-power is. It does not matter where you belong to, what matters is how strong your will is. History is full of such brave women standing up, fighting hard and achieving their goals.[irp]

One such incident took place in Pakistan, in a rural area of Pakistan. It is not a typo; this is not a fairy tale. Rural areas of Pakistan are well-known for injustice and inequality towards women, especially in the underdeveloped and third world countries like Pakistan.

In Pakistan, women are kept away from their equal and basic rights, oppressed, killed, silenced, made to work tirelessly, deprive of their property and kept chained within thoughts of the oppression.

Oscars are the most respectable and renounced well-known awards in the world, presented and titled to very extraordinary movies, dramas, documentaries and short films made on core issues. One such movie has been selected for next year academic awards.

The story of that movie relates Nazo Dharejo who was born in a conservative family in rural area of Sindh Province, and she was only permitted to learn the Quran at home but she convinced her father to allow her to study which paved the way for her to attain BA in economics at Sindh University where she could study at home and appear for exams.

She said, “The modern justice system has made few inroads into rural Sindh, where little has changed for centuries in a society dominated by feudalists, and the bloody years-long fight over her family’s land threatened many times to spoil her progress. Five, six murders took place and in 1992 my brother was also murdered.”

She explained, continuing to furthermore unfortunate incidents like the death of her father in the same year, and the taunts of the women informing them that no male heir was alive from their family, meaning the end of their generation and family. Taunts are like scars, leaving an everlasting sign.

The fight started on their family property. Her grandfather had several wives and the male members in other branches of the family were laying a claim to her inheritance. She explained that one day 200 armed men surrounded their house on August 2005. She and her sister grabbed Kalashnikov and a stock of ammunition and climbed to the roof.

That gunfight followed earned her a name “Pakistan’s toughest woman.” She just murmured words that she will kill them or die but never hideaway. She explained that her husband tried to stop her but she refused and stood against her own relatives who had a long sought to take their family property after her father died.

This tiny army fought the battle with bravery from the rooftop until the daylight broke. She said five-year battle finally ended and saw her enemies pay $4,800 as compensation and offer a public excuse.

This story came to attention to British Born Pakistani filmmaker Sarmad Masud. He made a 98 minute Urdu language film of Dharejo’s story which became the UK’s official entry in Oscar’s foreign language category.

Dharejo said she was very happy that the success story belongs to Sindh and Pakistan.”  She said, “That is an honor for me.”

Source: Arab News